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Why employability matters

UK universities growing global graduates

Individuals choose to study different courses and at different institutions for a variety of reasons. The data show 87% of international students studying at Alliance universities are motivated to study to get a good job. Students recognise the value of higher education in improving their employability and the data suggest that Alliance universities attract students particularly focused on their future careers.

Highly motivated and highly satisfied students

motivated

Our analysis found interesting variation by nationality, subject level of study and gender. Across the UK, female students were more driven to study to get a good job than their male counterparts. Female Alliance students were particularly career focused with 91% studying to get a good job compared with 84% of female students across UK universities. Responses for European students were higher than other students, 87% of international students studying at Alliance universities are motivated to study to get a good job. Irish students at Alliance universities were particularly driven with 96% motivated to study to get a good job.

Those at Alliance universities studying subjects not linked to a particular vocation were more likely to report that they studied to get a good job compared to others studying in the same subject area at other universities.

The difference is most noticeable in languages, literature, linguistics and classics, between 12 and 17 percentage points higher at Alliance universities. This could indicate that the focus on employability across all subject areas has been recognised by students.

We also looked at whether students wanted to make a lot of money. Students were not as motivated by wanting to make a lot of money as they were to get a good job, but this was still a motivation to study for 76% of Alliance students and 71% globally. A third of Alliance international students agreed that work was more important to them than personal life, slightly higher than the global figure of 29%. Responses to these two personal drivers greatly varied across nationalities, mode of study and subject area.

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